MAKE IT LAST | MENDING BASICS

LEARN BASIC MENDING

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For people who love their clothes, few things are more disheartening than finding a rip or snag in their favourite garment. For those of us who don't understand garment repair, these garments pile up in the corners of our closets to serve as a silent reproach, until we decide to throw them out.
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Mending and sewing are often considered old-fashioned activities, associated with a bygone era where people had limited access to manufactured goods or made do with wartime rations. Now, with increased accessibility to fast and cheap fashion, mending has fallen out of practice.
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Most damaged garments can be fixed by knowing just a few simple stitches. The running stitch and back stitch are sturdy stitches great for mending opened seams and ripped darts. Knowledge on mending fasteners will help salvage shirts with missing buttons and trousers with damaged zippers.
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Mending is remarkably easy, surprisingly quick, and incredibly gratifying. Learning how to evaluate a damaged area and familiarising yourself with basic mending techniques are all one needs to get started. By mending treasured garments, you can enjoy them longer, take pleasure in your artisanal self-sufficiency, and do your part in leaving a smaller footprint on the planet.
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REPAIR BEFORE REPLACING

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If a garment has been damaged, here are a few things that you should keep in mind to restore it:
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1. It's best to get the garment repaired as soon as possible, even if it means just temporarily fixing it. Delaying the mending process may cause the damage to get worse.
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2. Do not wash the garment as it definitely will cause the damage to get worse.
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3. Before mending the garment, it is advisable to iron the garment to align the fabric. This will ensure that the repair is as neat as possible.
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4. Always work in a well-lit area.
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5. Choose a thread of the same colour as the fabric.
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6. Avoid using long strands of threads to sew as it may lead to knots and tangling.
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SASHIKO

the Japanese art of visible mending

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Sashiko, an ancient japanese art of mending fabric, has a deep history that belies its simplicity.
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The simple running stitch was used to reinforce weakened fabric over a thousand years ago and has been a mainstay of Japanese peasants, artists, and even firefighters.
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Drawing inspiration from Japanese wabi-sabi philosophy, the damage on the fabric was celebrated, rather than hidden with precise running stitches. Sashiko is typically done with a white thread on an indigo fabric. A crucial element of sashiko is stitch consistency and, depending on region, this could vary from five to ten stitches per inch. This, of course, requires a steady hand and an immense amount of skill, something that Japanese artisans honed, mainly during the winter months.
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Sashiko, in the early days, was always made for personal or family use, giving it a unique homespun feel. No one’s sashiko was quite like anyone else’s. Those meticulous stitches reflected the personal wear and artistic vision of whoever took the time to actually stitch them.Today, Shashiko has become a means of self-expression. While mending garments in a highly-visible style, a rip can turn into a piece of art, something that makes it uniquely yours.

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